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Photos from 23rd ‘Stay Put’ Sewol silent protest

Photos from 21st ‘Stay Put’ Sewol silent protest

On 16th January 2016, we held the 21st ‘Stay Put’ Sewol silent monthly protest to remember the Sewol disaster on 16 April 2014 and demand an independant inquiry and proper anti-disaster regulations from the South Korean government.

Continue reading “Photos from 21st ‘Stay Put’ Sewol silent protest”

Support messages to Korean ‘Comfort Women’ | OhMyNews

OhMyNews.com reports that in response to the controversial agreement on ‘comfort women’ issues between governments of Korea and Japan, many sent messages supporting the Korean victims who said that it is a betrayal and they will continue their fight.

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Click here to see more photos…

Photos from 19th ‘Stay Put’ Sewol silent protest

Urgent Action Call | Amnesty International

Amnesty International Germany called for urgent action to drop all charges against Park Rae-goon and Kim Hye-jin who helped to organise protests seeking justice for the victims and families of the Sewol ferry disaster.

The original statement (in German) is available at Amnesty International Germany website.

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Urgent Action

Human rights defenders Park Rae-goon and Kim Hye-Jin both face imprisonment. They have helped organise protests seeking justice for the victims and families of victims of the SEWOL ferry. The proceedings against them commenced on October 14th, 2015, with the verdict being expected in December.  Continue reading “Urgent Action Call | Amnesty International”

The Deep Fissure | Amnesty International

Amnesty International Germany’s 92nd report on human rights in South Korea includes the following article written by Hans Buchner, Coordinator for South Korea.

The original text and Korean translation are available at Sewol Berlin blog.

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The Deep Fissure

The MV Sewol sank in April 2014. Three-hundred and four passengers – most of them adolescents –  died. Nine of the victims remain missing.

The disaster has profoundly changed South Korean society.

A deep fissure has suddenly appeared in the shiny surface of the economic power; negligence and corruption, reaching far beyond this particular incident, have become apparent.

Continue reading “The Deep Fissure | Amnesty International”

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